15min5

Twisted flowers and tales to match: phylogenetic inference of Australian Caesia (Asphodelaceae, Hemerocallidoideae).

Aiden T. Webb (University of Melbourne); Joanne L. Birch (University of Melbourne); Russell L. Barrett (National Herbarium of New South Wales); Terry D. Macfarlane (Western Australian Herbarium). Caesia R.Br. (Asphodelaceae, Hemerocallidoideae) is a predominantly Australian, tepaloid monocot genus with high species diversity in the east and south-west. It contains 14 species and at least eight additional entities …

Twisted flowers and tales to match: phylogenetic inference of Australian Caesia (Asphodelaceae, Hemerocallidoideae). Read More »

Making the Australian crustaceans known – the decadal plan and the generational challenge.

Rachael A. King (South Australian Museum, Adelaide); Shane T. Ahyong (Australian Museum and University of NSW). Crustaceans, sometimes dubbed the insects of the sea, are the most abundant and speciose aquatic arthropods. Notwithstanding that hexapods are now known to be derived from within Crustacea (and are therefore also crustaceans), we focus here on the non-hexapod …

Making the Australian crustaceans known – the decadal plan and the generational challenge. Read More »

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