Triodia hummock grass systematics, hybridization and polyploidy (Poaceae: Chloridoideae).

Triodia hummock grass systematics, hybridization and polyploidy (Poaceae: Chloridoideae).

Matthew D. BarrettRoom 2: T2

Matthew D. Barrett (Australian Tropical Herbarium); Ian D. Cowie (formerly Dept. of Environment, Northern Territory Government); Russell L. Barrett (National Herbarium of New South Wales); Benjamin M. Anderson (Western Australian Herbarium, Dept. of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions); Kevin R. Thiele (Australian Government, Dept. of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water); Siegfried L. Krauss (Kings Park Science, Dept. of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions); Pauline F. Grierson (The University of Western Australia).

The Australian hummock grass genus Triodia R.Br. contains numerous morphological forms that have been discovered since the last revision of the genus in 2005. More than fifty novel species have been described or are in review since 2011. Here, we provide an overview of these new taxa, using the framework of a geographically comprehensive ribosomal phylogeny containing 533 terminals. Most of the new species occur on rocky substrates and have a range of between 1 and 200 km, often restricted to localised geological landforms. We consider evidence for hybridsation, particularly in relation to the status of T. prona Lazarides, and the role of polyploidy in diversification of the genus. With these new discoveries, Triodia will becomes the most species-rich grass genus in Australia, accounting for about 10% of Australian native grass species diversity. The new taxonomic and phylogenetic framework will provide resources for the conservation and utilisation of grassland diversity, enabling new insight into the evolution of seasonally arid biomes. 

Matthew Barrett: matt.barrett@jcu.edu.au
Sun 8:20 am - 12:00 am
Symposium: Plants
plants
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