Symposium: Biogeography

Biosystematics of Australia’s native dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

Nicole L. Gunter (The Cleveland Museum of Natural History and Queensland Museum). Australia’s native dung beetles are unique and diverse, representing ~5% of the global dung beetle fauna. The comprehensive revisions of the Australian Scarabaeinae by Matthews (1972, 1974 & 1976) documented 284 native species and provided a framework for subsequent revisions.  Since then, just …

Biosystematics of Australia’s native dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae). Read More »

The biogeographic and evolutionary history of an extraordinary species radiation across an extreme elevational gradient.

Adrián Villastrigo (SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München); Steven J. B. Cooper (South Australian Museum and The University of Adelaide); Barbara Langille (The University of Adelaide and Huntsman Marine Science Centre, Canada); Erinn P. Fagan-Jeffries (The University of Adelaide), William F. Humphreys (Western Australian Museum and University of Western Australia); Lars Hendrich (SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München); Michael Balke (SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München …

The biogeographic and evolutionary history of an extraordinary species radiation across an extreme elevational gradient. Read More »

The genus Carex (Cyperaceae) in New Zealand: a southern hemisphere diversity hotspot in a boreotemperate genus.

Santiago Martín-Bravo (Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain), James McCarthy (Landcare Research, New Zealand), José Ignacio Márquez-Corro (Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, England), María Sanz-Arnal (Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain), Ana Morales-Alonso (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain), Pablo García-Moro (Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain), Kerry A. Ford (Landcare Research, New Zealand). Carex is a megadiverse genus with about 2000 …

The genus Carex (Cyperaceae) in New Zealand: a southern hemisphere diversity hotspot in a boreotemperate genus. Read More »

Systematic revision of Pedicularis L. (Orobanchaceae) for the Flora of Bhutan.

Rinchen Yangzom (University of New England)  Pedicularis, a charismatic genus of hemiparasitic plants in Orobanchaceae, predominantly thrives in the alpine and artic regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Bhutan is home to 69 taxa of Pedicularis, of about 800 species worldwide. Despite several taxonomic efforts a considerable number of Pedicularis taxa remain taxonomically unresolved and a significant portion of …

Systematic revision of Pedicularis L. (Orobanchaceae) for the Flora of Bhutan. Read More »

Phylogenetic analyses of the liverwort family Lepidoziaceae reveals the position of Micropterygioideae.

Antonio L. Rayos, Jr. (School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney and Institute of Biological Sciences, University of the Philippines Los Baños); Matthew A.M. Renner (National Herbarium of New South Wales, Australian Institute of Botanical Science, Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust); Simon Y.W. Ho (School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney). …

Phylogenetic analyses of the liverwort family Lepidoziaceae reveals the position of Micropterygioideae. Read More »

Rethinking the systematics, evolution and biogeographic history of the mahogany family (Meliaceae).

Elizabeth M. Joyce (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München). Meliaceae is an economically valuable family of c. 740 species, with a high diversity of lifeforms and habitats throughout its predominantly pantropical distribution. Despite the economic and biological importance of the family, infra-familial relationships remain unclear. Further, recent fossil evidence brings the assumed African origin of the family into question. In …

Rethinking the systematics, evolution and biogeographic history of the mahogany family (Meliaceae). Read More »

Biogeography of the only irises disjunct across the Pacific Ocean.

Sophie S. Newmarch (Massey University); Richard C. Winkworth (Massey University); Dan J. Blanchon (Auckland War Memorial Museum); Joanne L. Birch (University of Melbourne); Nicolás García (Universidad de Chile); Jennifer A. Tate (Massey University). Taxa with disjunct distributions have long fascinated biologists and have provided important insights into biological evolution in the southern hemisphere. Libertia and Orthrosanthus are two understudied …

Biogeography of the only irises disjunct across the Pacific Ocean. Read More »

A big burst of blindsnakes: Phylogenomics and historical biogeography of Australia’s most species-rich snake genus.

Sarin Tiatragul (Australian National University); Elizabeth S. Broady (Australian National University); Ian G. Brennan (Australian National University); J. Scott Keogh (Australian National University). Blindsnakes are cylindrical-bodied snakes with reduced vision and have scales that completely cover their eyes. Out of over 450 described species of blindsnakes globally, the Australo-Papuan blindsnake radiation is among the most species …

A big burst of blindsnakes: Phylogenomics and historical biogeography of Australia’s most species-rich snake genus. Read More »

Cave cricket capers: An extraordinary diversity and evolutionary history revealed by molecular phylogenetics (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae)

Perry G Beasley-Hall (The University of Adelaide); Steven Trewick (Massey University, New Zealand); Liz Reed (South Australian Museum); Steven J B Cooper (South Australian Museum); Andrew D Austin (The University of Adelaide). Cave crickets (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) are an understudied group of insects that act as keystone species in subterranean habitats. In the remnants of Gondwana–South America, …

Cave cricket capers: An extraordinary diversity and evolutionary history revealed by molecular phylogenetics (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) Read More »

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