Symposium: Taxonomy Australia

Making the Australian crustaceans known – the decadal plan and the generational challenge.

Rachael A. King (South Australian Museum, Adelaide); Shane T. Ahyong (Australian Museum and University of NSW). Crustaceans, sometimes dubbed the insects of the sea, are the most abundant and speciose aquatic arthropods. Notwithstanding that hexapods are now known to be derived from within Crustacea (and are therefore also crustaceans), we focus here on the non-hexapod …

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Meeting the challenge of the Decadal Plan: the taxonomic documentation of the Australian arachnid fauna.

Mark S. Harvey (Western Australian Museum and University of Western Australia); Michael G. Rix (Queensland Museum and Western Australian Museum); Owen Seeman (Queensland Museum).           The taxonomic documentation of Australia’s major arthropod lineages remains the biggest challenge posed by the Decadal Plan. The 13 extant orders of Arachnida present in Australia include the spiders (Araneae), scorpions …

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Systematics of tiny black acalyptrate flies as case studies for challenges in Australian biodiversity research.

Keith M. Bayless (CSIRO Australian National Insect Collection).   Flies (Diptera) are among the most poorly known Australian insects. These ecologically labile, fragile insects need specialised techniques to collect and preserve. While technological advances in sequencing and artificial intelligence will streamline aspects of biodiversity characterisation, shifts in researcher mindset and education policy are needed to circumscribe …

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Two perspectives on the Decadal Plan: public engagement, and the plight of parasitoid wasps.

Erinn P. Fagan-Jeffries (The University of Adelaide & South Australian Museum).        Meeting the challenges proposed by the Taxonomy Australia Decadal Plan will require a layered approach. We need to think bigger, and work more collaboratively with each other and with the public. In the field of hymenopteran taxonomy, where we deal with the issues associated …

Two perspectives on the Decadal Plan: public engagement, and the plight of parasitoid wasps. Read More »

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